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Tax Season for Pets

Wahooo it’s the beginning tax season! Sorry, I know for fur-less beings tax season is akin to a snow-less winter, a weekend of domestic chores, or even to sticking pins under your fingernails. But for us furry folk it means saving lives, thanks to the Colorado Pet Overpopulation Fund (CPOF). I will tell you how this works…  

CPOF was initially established by the Colorado State Legislature to curb pet overpopulation and reduce the euthanasia of surplus unwanted pets in Colorado. The focus and success of this program makes it, from a canine’s opinion, the smartest and most positive act of a legislating body. At least until they pass the bill on giving dogs bacon for breakfast every day that I submitted last year.

Since its inception in 2001, CPOF has generated $2.7 million in grants for animal welfare programs in Colorado and subsidized more than 60,000 spay and neuter surgeries for dogs and cats in underserved areas of Colorado. Wow, think about how many homeless and unwanted puppies and kittens 60,000 surgeries have prevented (particularly when you consider there are still 3 million pets being euthanized annually in the U.S.).

So how does the fund work? On your Colorado tax return form simply enter the amount you wish to contribute on the voluntary contributions schedule and the State of Colorado will forward the amount you designate (no amount is too small) to the Pet Overpopulation Fund. Your donation is tax deductible and anonymous.

Please note, last year the Colorado Legislature and the Department of Revenue made changes to the tax checkoff donation process and no longer accept donations through the tax form if you are not receiving a state refund; it will only be able to retain money from those who are getting a state refund. So, if you are interested in donating to the fund but aren't receiving a tax refund, you may make a direct donation online or via regular mail.

Your donation will enter the collective which helps to fund local coalitions of veterinarians, humane societies, animal care and control agencies, and community groups to perform spay and neuter surgeries in underserved areas of Colorado. Low-income San Miguel, Ouray & Montrose County residents benefit from this program as Second Chance Humane Society receives funding from CPOF each year to support its low-cost spay/neuter program.  

Another beneficial program that CPOF created is the Adopt-a-Shelter Pet License Plate Program. The next time you go in to register your car purchase these sporty Adopt-a-Shelter-Pet license plates (there are over 15,000 on the roads now!) to support animal welfare.  

The License Plate Program began in 2011 and has generated over $1.5 million to spay/neuter and provide medical treatment and microchip identification for shelter animals. This has allowed animal welfare agencies across the state to be able to afford to spay/neuter pets before adopting pets out. Naturally this has a great impact upon reducing pet overpopulation in Colorado.

Speaking of shelter animals, I would like to introduce myself. I go by the name of Nia. I am a 3-year young cattle dog mix seeking a loving forever family. I am a timid girl but, if you are patient and gentle, I warm up quickly as I truly do want to be your best friend. Come meet me today!

Second Chance Humane Society Animal Resource Center and Thrift Shops service San Miguel, Ouray and Montrose counties. Call the SCHS Helpline at 970-626-2273 to report a lost pet or to learn about adopting a homeless pet and the SCHS spay/neuter, volunteer, feral cat or other programs. View our shelter pets and services at adoptmountainpets.org

Speaking of shelter animals, I would like to introduce myself. I go by the name of Nia. I am a 3-year young cattle dog mix seeking a loving forever family. I am a timid girl but, if you are patient and gentle, I warm up quickly as I truly do want to be your best friend. Come meet me today!

Second Chance Humane Society Animal Resource Center and Thrift Shops service San Miguel, Ouray and Montrose counties. Call the SCHS Helpline at 970-626-2273 to report a lost pet or to learn about adopting a homeless pet and the SCHS spay/neuter, volunteer, feral cat or other programs. View our shelter pets and services at adoptmountainpets.org

Second Chance Humane Society Animal Resource Center and Thrift Shops service San Miguel, Ouray and Montrose counties. Call the SCHS Helpline at 970-626-2273 to report a lost pet or to learn about adopting a homeless pet and the SCHS spay/neuter, volunteer, feral cat or other programs. View our shelter pets and services at adoptmountainpets.org.

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Bindi

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Chara

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Junior

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Second Chance Humane Society

Animal Resource Center

Ridgway Thrift

Telluride Thrift

Shelter Hours

Open Tuesday - Saturday

Animal Resource Center
11 am - 6 pm

Cat Castle
11 am - 6 pm

Dog Den
11 am - 5:45 pm


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Managed by PMC